Minister Pandor outlines government’s long-term plan for TVET colleges in South Africa Minister Pandor outlines government’s long-term plan for TVET colleges in South Africa
Stronger Technical, Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges will expand the provision of mid-level technical and occupational qualifications that will lead directly into paid... Minister Pandor outlines government’s long-term plan for TVET colleges in South Africa

Stronger Technical, Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges will expand the provision of mid-level technical and occupational qualifications that will lead directly into paid work and self-employment for the growing numbers of young people leaving the schooling system, so believes the Minister of Higher Education and Training, Naledi Pandor.

Speaking at a function to officially open Capricorn College for TVET’s new central office building in Polokwane this morning, Minister Pandor said, government wants and needs more young people to attain skills and competencies that will help them find jobs or create their own enterprises.

“I have seen some positive changes in TVET colleges, but they need more and better support.  TVET colleges cannot be expected to improve capacity and quality without adequate planning, support and resources” she added.

Minister announced that government has a long-term plan for TVET’s, and as part of it, “ by 2030, TVET colleges will be strong, differentiated institutions, offering a range of high quality programmes preparing students for the world of work and for future technological developments. Colleges will offer qualifications that are responsive to the needs of students, and regional and national labour demand.”

Other key elements of this plan, include an effective enrolment planning system which will be in place to determine the necessary programme-qualification mix for the colleges and to guide appropriate resourcing.

“In particular I’m looking for better enrolment planning that will allow for better decisions about areas of specialisation in colleges. I’m looking for growth over time of new qualifications, without immediately dropping opportunities that are currently in place,”  Minister Pandor said.

She said by 2030, employer uptake of students and partnerships with TVET colleges will have greatly improved;  examination and certification will be streamlined and will be more efficient and effective;  there will be more and better qualified lecturers and the lecturer:student ratio will improve; governance and management capacity will be greatly improved and colleges will be functioning more effectively; and, retention and throughput, and exit level outcomes as well as pathways to other post-school institutions will be greatly improved.

“That’s the plan.” Minister Pandor ended to a thunderous applause.

About the building and Capricorn College for TVET

The newly revamped, state-of-the-art, multi-layer building, which consists of 64 offices, parking, 3 boardrooms, 2 staffrooms, 2 chambers, 3 store-rooms and a wellness room, was made possible by the funding that Capricorn College of TVET received from the Department of Higher Education and Training.

It cost a total of R51.7 million and was built over period of three years.

Capricorn College for TVET is a product of a merger of Colleges with very distinct and diverse historical backgrounds. These were the former Pietersburg Technical College (PTC), Bochum College of Education and the former Northern Province Community College (NPCC).

Capricorn College for TVET was established in 2003, under the leadership of Mr Khorombi Ronald Madzhie, who led the College for 14 years until his retirement in June 2017.

 

Issued by the Ministry of Higher Education and Training

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